Willenhall History Society

Street Names - V

A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W Y

 

Vaughan Road. This road is named as a tribute to the various people named Vaughan who over the years have made a substantial contribution to the industrial development of the town. Near to the road at the junction of Noose Lane with Wolverhampton Road stood the Mitre Works of A.J. Vaughan Ltd. who for many years produced high class drop forgings for the world's markets until they fell victim to the recession. The premises are now occupied by the Middleton Paper Co. Travelling in the other direction the works of Vaughan Brothers Ltd Eagle Works stood in Somerford and like their namesakes produced high class drop forgings with Eagle Brand spanners being a speciality. The works was for a short time taken over by a firm called Shakespeare before they too called it a day as a result of the recession. By a coincidence these premises are now also occupied by the Middleton Paper Co Ltd. Last but not least H & T Vaughan Ltd. whose Standard Works in Wood Street produced locks and keys over many years. The business has had a chequered life for on the death of both partners the factory was bought by an American Company The Yale and Towne Manufacturing Co Ltd who continued to produce Locks and Keys under their "Yale" trade mark. After a spell in the ownership of the Valor Group the firm passed into the ownership of the Williams group and trades today as Yale Security Products Ltd. Still producing the world famous lock with the "Yale" trademark.

Vernon Close. A street leading off New Street in Portobello. The name commemorates the famous naval victory of Admiral Vernon at Portobello in 1736. The name Portobello also commemorates this battle.

Victoria Street. Commemorates the long reign of Queen Victoria. 1837 to 1901.

Villiers Street. Named after Sir Charles Pelham Villiers who was Liberal Member of Parliament for Wolverhampton, which also included Willenhall, from 1835 until his death in 1898. During his early years he campaigned strongly for the repeal of the Corn Laws and a statue was erected in Wolverhampton to commemorate his efforts in this direction. When the town centre was remodelled some years ago the statue was moved to the West Park where it still stands. The road was sewered, levelled, metalled, channelled and made good in 1909.


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